off trekking

...trekking through the last few weeks of this semester, that is. I've been buried alive in deadlines, papers and other time suckers so I apologize for my lack in activity on this blog lately. My normal posting will resume soon  eventually. Meanwhile, enjoy the scenery and think of me as I attempt to use one, if not all, of these excuses.

On another note: you can look forward to a monday mix next week soon of all of my favorite 90s hits (or most, at least... there are so many!) Also I have another weekly blog post up my sleeves called Midnight Sessions, so check in again soon!

photo source


I Believe I Can Fly: flight of the frenchies

  1. The quality of this film [in regards to color and angle execution] is simply, stunning.
  2. These guys are crazy. This documentary follows a group of (mostly) French guys in their recreational activity of "skylining" (which combines base jumping, tightrope walking, and slacklining). My heart was racing just in the few short minutes of this trailer as I watch these guys just casually do flips off cliffs that are hundreds of feet up (my limit is 30ft), tightrope-walk across buildings and said cliffs, or y'know, just hang by their toes with just a parachute to catch them when they (inevitably) fall...
  3. I can't wait to watch the rest.


music for your ears: video and links

No mix this week. Unfortunately, time escaped me this weekend. On the bright side, this video by Jarbas Agnelli is incredibly interesting. Having taken a photograph of birds perched atop wires, he wondered what 'sound' they would make if they were instead notes on staff paper (the kind of paper you write music on). Without digitally altering any of the birds, he produced a melody to the photograph.

Agnelli said, "I knew it wasn't the most original idea in the universe. I was just curious to hear what melody the birds were creating." Well, I disagree. I think it was incredibly original and fascinating to watch. And it was a sweet melody, too, that will likely pop in my head now whenever I look up and see birds scattered along the wires.

Other musical links from around the webosphere:

spent: a challenge

Want to play a game? The challenge is: Can you make it through the month? This "game," released in February 2011, is created by Urban Ministries of Durham (a non-religious based organization in North Carolina) who provides food, clothing, shelter and other services to its surrounding communities.

Their concept is simple. As the player you learn that you have lost your job and are already low on cash (because, really, how many of us are able to maintain a large savings account?) and you're then asked the basic question: "Can you make it through the month?" The two first options you are confronted with are A) find a job or B) exit the game. By accepting the "challenge" you then enter a heart thumping series of choices and confrontations each with their own consequences (that come from real statistics.)

I barely made it through the month (which sounds similar to my own reality), but overall this idea is an engaging way to educate those who don't quite understand what it's like to live on a low-income salary. So I triple dog dare you. Play the game and see how you do: Spent.


aubade - philip larkin

I work all day, and get half-drunk at night.
Waking at four to soundless dark, I stare.
In time the curtain-edges will grow light.
Till then I see what's really always there:
Unresting death, a whole day nearer now,
Making all thought impossible but how
And where and when I shall myself die.
Arid interrogation: yet the dread
Of dying, and being dead,
Flashes afresh to hold and horrify.

The mind blanks at the glare. Not in remorse
- The good not done, the love not given, time
Torn off unused - nor wretchedly because 
an only life can take so long to climb
Clear of its wrong beginnings, and may never;
But at the total emptiness for ever,
The sure extinction that we travel to
And shall be lost in always. Not to be here,
Not to be anywhere,
And soon; nothing more terrible, nothing more true

visual trickery: fredo

This young (& extremely talented) artist, Fredo, is giving the late M. C. Escher a run for his money with these amazing 3-D illustrations. A few of these required me to take a second, and third, glance just to separate what's real and what's not. These are making me nostalgic for my M.C. Escher pop up book I had growing up as a kid...

Source and Fredo's website.